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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
got props. the clinton era rates which america will return to in january unless the fiscal cliff is resolved. it brought more revenues than at any point in the 1980s. thank you. [ applause ] >> grover! >> stephanie: norquist and maria commented this is a different environment than the 1990s. grover said we got four years of bad regulation, higher taxes. he wants to add more taxes to the tea party too. it will starve tea party i if obama pushes us over the cliff. [ screaming ] >> can't just wait for tea party three. >> probably about 150 billion. >> stephanie: that would be bad. okay. oh, let's see. phillip in durham disagrees with everything i say. about everything? >> ever! >> stephanie: hi, phillip. >> caller: hi, stephanie. look. appreciate the show. i think you have not been fair to the facts and let me just ask you from the -- what we're talking about -- >> stephanie: the facts are oversensitive in my opinion. >> caller: that's why you're better as a comedian than a political pundit. >> stephanie:
on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's a wrong approach. >> stephanie: which one was that? >> that was six. >> stephanie: okay. no, i wanted 8. >> the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. calls for a little -- not even $400 billion in cuts and they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. it was not a serious proposal. >> not serious. >> so right now we're almost nowhere. >> stephanie: here's the reason why we're almost nowhere. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] boehner declines to name certain entitlement cuts. asked what specific cuts over the fiscal cliff he pointed reporters to previous budgets declining to name further -- >> stuff. >> stephanie: then he said there is a stalemate because -- >> stalemate. do not put anything on the
and others to avoid the fiscal cliff between now and december 31st but take what we agree on which is that the middle class tax cuts should be extended and tax rates should not go up for the middle class, let's do that now. the republicans refuse to do that thus far, which is sort of baffling. even some of their senior members like tom cole from oklahoma have said let's take that deal, but let's pass the tax cuts for the middle class and we're talking about making sure that tax rates for 98% of all americans and 97% of all businesses. it's a small percentage of individuals that make more than $250,000 a year that tax rates would go up just a little bit. we had an election, thomas, where americans had a clear choice and they chose and we need to make sure that we think a balanced approach that is fair, that doesn't throw the middle class under the bus and that works mathematically. so far what we've seen from republicans in the house does not work in terms of reducing the deficit. >> congresswoman, we are watching the president on our screen at the business roundtable. there was an
prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during debt limit talks early next year. yesterday at a business roundtable of ceos, president obama took a hard line, warning his opponents not to consider this strategy. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to dell creting votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> well, i wonder, the president's saying, steve, that, you know what, we can
the fiscal cliff. check this out. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. we see no prospects for an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthist. remember it's only 2%. >> reporter: most people think a deal will be struck between the president and the speaker of the house, the fact that they are talking and not leaking may be a good sign, jenna. jenna: we'll see. what role has treasury secretary timothy geithner, we just heard from him there, what role has he played in awful all o all of this. >> he's been the public spokesman and delivered the president's plan to capitol hill, which they said was not serious. you had mitch mcconnell try to bring up the geithner-obama plan for a vote. check this out. >> this the president's proposal was made in good faith our friends should be eager to vote for it, so i'm surprised the majority leader just declined the chance for them to support it with their votes. so, i guess we're left to conclude that it couldn't even pass by a bare majority of votes and that they'd
creditors and there may be others in the pipeline. bill: negotiations on that fiscal cliff and his first one-on-one television interview since reelection president obama says he will only agree to a deal that raises tax rates on top earners. >> we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or cut our way out of this deficit problem. we are going to need more revenues. in order to do that that start with higher rates for the folk at the top. the reasonien, the reason i say that is not to punish success or go after folk just because they are wealthy. it's a simple proposition that you can't raise enough revenue and if you don't raise enough revenue through closing loopholes abductions, it's going to be middle class families that make up the difference. bill: john boehner will speak later this hour. we'll see how he responds to that comment. if washington can't get a deep, automatic tax increases and massive spending cuts do take effect. martha: west virginia senator joe manchin, a democrat discussing the fiscal cliff, social security within medicare. he believes they must be run more ef
of the fiscal cliff discussions and sat down for lunch with former rival mitt romney. >> i am sure they will or have already compared experiences on the campaign trail. >> today president obama hits the road to push for his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republicans have slammed him for campaign-style politics that they say just won't get the job done. rob and sunny, back to you. >> can you really imagine that they're not going to reach some sort of deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? i mean that would be so unpopular across the nation. >> you would -- if you can take an action that would solve the problem for 98% of the country and then come back to the debate about the wealthiest 2%, let's get that first chunk done. republicans fear they could lose leverage if they cave in on the middle-class issue. apparently the president, his team has made increased demand here including, a provision now, part of the negotiations where, the congressional control over the debt limit would go away. and congress does not like to have its power take any way. so maybe the white house, upped the an
the fiscal cliff, which could make it even worse. so we need to do all we can to ensure that our workers and our farmers have access to the 95% of consumers who live outside of our borders. that adds jobs. and when companies consider whether they're going to get into the export business or not which, again, creates opportunity here, they want to know are they going to be treated with certainty, predictability, with fairness in the marketplace. exporters need to know that the country doesn't play by the rules, that country will then face consequences. and those consequences really is what the world trade organization is all about. that's why this discussion is so important, because by today or tomorrow voting to authorize permanent normal trade relations with russia, we then can take advantage of the world trade organization rules as they relate to russia and our trade with them. russia joined the w.t.o. on august 22, and the united states was a big part of that accession we were talking for 18 years with russia to ensure they would go along with certain fair provisions on trade. we need
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)